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the still pub tour

The Still is a cozy, Irish community pub with family tradition.  We like to think of it as an extension of Ireland located right here in County Baltimore.  Our intention is to delight you as our welcomed guest with cheer, quality, and charm. In creating The Still, we requested attention to every detail from our Irish & American architects in our effort to insure your merriment.  As you arrived from York road, our hope is that you were visually transported as if you had strolled upon an Irish village. The main of the building is designed as a series of doors replicating actual store fronts found in Ireland. Up high, facing the four winds, multiple tower clocks stand above the castle-like entrance to the Pub. Let’s begin our tour of the place we affectionately describe as “A Wee Bit of Heaven.” As you enter through the “Hundred Thousand Welcomes” doors, your eyes focus on a uniquely shaped bar which has several different styles. Look closer. The first style is that of a Pulpit Bar - traditionally manned by a single bartender. To the right, there is a more casual Public Bar - designed for “Punters,” those who prefer to stand. Continuing back is another section of the bar called the Parlor Bar with it’s motif of the Victorian Age and paintings of Irish horseRacing. It is here at “The Judges’ Side Bar” that many great men and women have enjoyed time away from work. It was very common in earlier days that the living room of a local family’s home served as a community pub. And as this pub became more popular, the bar itself would grow larger while however, in turn the living quarters of the home would grow smaller.  Our Victorian Parlor Lounge just over to the side is an example of this occurrence. Its tables, chairs and roaring fireplace exemplify the cozy feeling of an original homestyle pub. Let's continue our journey.  Returning your gaze back to the entrance doors, you notice a remnant of a wooden wall - the top of which has been burned. This is called an Eviction Wall. During the Great Potato Famine of 1845 to1852, many Irish became unable to farm their land. Having no money to pay the British tariffs, their homes were burned and destroyed. Eviction walls are reminders of this plight. However, being strong of mind - which is the nature of the irish - many families did recover and in the spirit of fortitude chose to build a new homes right around such a wall. Around the way, Casey’s Cottage awaits your entrance. This room is a great representation of a typical dwelling found in the irish countryside. Inside, many authentic decorations adorn the room. A stove burns in the corner heating this cozy area while on the wall a mural shows Mrs. Casey spinning her yarn. It has been rumored that many a night after closing, she wanders through and tidies up the pub for the next day. Exiting the cottage you stand in front of a Snob Screen. Every great pub is for every one - from all walks of life. Yet in times past, such a table often had a divider across its middle to keep separate the different classes of people who shared the room. We however have removed the original glass divider of this table. Because as William Butler Yeats once said: “There are no strangers here; Only friends you haven’t yet met.” Returning to the bar, straight ahead and which extends to the far left, is a Shop Bar that includes facades of a Pharmacy and a Hardware Store.  A quick visit to “Wigs Way” gives  you insight into the personalities of the many characters who own, run, have worked, and still do... work here. Next ahead lies a circular, stone castle-like room, called The Monk’s Cell. This is a special room - a tribute to the many circular towers that still stand in various parts around Ireland. For atop  towers, in rooms just like this one,  monks would isolate themselves to meditate and pray.  However, it was these very same Irish monks who are to be thanked for saving many great works of literature from destruction during the Viking rampages. The stained glass windows of this room lay respect to the traditionally religious background of the Irish people. While replicas of great art from The Book of Kells adorn the walls in honor of the handcrafted master version of The New Testament which is housed with great care in the library of Trinity College in Dublin City. Next up is our Minstrel Gallery. This area represents the place where Royalty would sit as they welcomed their guests into the banquet halls as minstrels would entertain nightly. This gallery is also elevated, has protective gates, and includes a table in the shape of a harp. It certainly has the best view of the other wonderful castle ruin which also serves as our stage for the bands and performers who entertain our royal crowds nightly. And the American flag which hangs over high does ever reminds us of the many Irish ancestors (and all other nationalities for that matter) who travelled so far to see the Statue of Liberty and to give so many the great opportunities of today. Past the Minstrel Gallery lies the Main Banquet Room. Complete with a large fireplace and hardwood ceilings of hand-hewn beams, this area is a replica of a castle banquet room adorned with swords, war armaments and chandeliers created out of stag horns. This grand old style dining room is to remind us that both grand stories and great laughter are always meant to fill the air in life.  Finally, to the back of the pub and restaurant is our Tack Room - dedicated to the green land of Ireland and to thecommon love of horses shared by both Ireland and Maryland.  Our favorite horse Chancellor awaits to greet you. And all the way over other to the complete opposite side of our building is our last striking feature - Our outdoor Paddy ‘o. With it’s own bar and dining area, it is perfect for our signature drink... the “Moe McGarity Irish Coffee.” Well that completes our pub tour. Enjoy your time here and please join us again anytime. Especially for St. Patrick’s Day every year on March 17th where we celebrate with a week long Festival of style. Thank you for visiting our magical and authentical pub, where at any time you can escape to Ireland with great ease & joy!

 

poitin: gaelic for moonshine